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Thread: From carving to casting. A plaque is born.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Central Wis.
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    665

    Default From carving to casting. A plaque is born.

    It's been several years since I posted and I doubt anyone even remembers me. Anyway I just completed a project that has been on my bucket list for several years. That project was to create a mold with the Carvewright and then cast it in metal.
    I first carved in poplar but realized that the end grain was going to be too rough to give a good casting. In order to rule out end grain I carved in MDF (medium density fiberboard) The MDF had too much chip out. I then tried HDF (high density fiberboard) and am very pleased with the smooth finish. I am attaching a pic of the poplar and the HDF.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
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    I next place the carve face up in the bottom of the casting flask and pack with casting sand.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #3
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    Central Wis.
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    I then flip the flask over and apply the top part of the two part casting flask. A powder is added to keep the top half from sticking to the bottom half. Sand is then added and packed in the top half.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #4
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    A pouring hole (the sprue) is added to the top half as well as 2 vent holes. The top half is lifted and the carving removed leaving a hollow imprint in the sand. The top half is put back in place.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #5
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    Mar 2007
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    For this trial run I choose to melt some aluminum scrap and poured into the mold. I then waited about 10 long minutes and then separated the two halves to reveal the casting.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6
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    Mar 2007
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    I then cut off the excess metal from the sprue and the vent holes, do a bit of sanding, then painting, and then finally sanding the paint off the high spots. I am pleased with the font I used as it gives a vintage look that I was after. I can see many new castings on my horizon as I continue to be amazed by the capabilities of the Carvewright. I hoped you enjoyed this thread. Jim

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Kaukauna, Wisconsin
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    572

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    From one Wisconsinite to another welcome back. I like the way the casting came out. I been considering doing a casting out of concrete for a burial marker. Have to agree that these machines can do great work and limits that can be hard to reach, if you let your mind wander bit.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Central Wis.
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    Thanks Mugsowner. I wish you the best on your casting adventure also.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southern Delaware
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    760

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    Another awesome project, I never would have thought using the carver for the mold. Final project turned out great Never done any casting, definitely peeked my interest.
    Rick H

  10. #10

    Default

    Good job, thanks for sharing...

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