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Thread: Ash wood advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    New Iberia, la.
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    Default Ash wood advice

    I have some That was given to me for the pictures in wood project, is it soft, hard ?
    should it carve a picture well, any advice would help.
    see attached.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Southern Delaware
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    Default

    Ash is a hard wood. Have never carved any but have burnt a lot in my wood stove. It rates higher than white oak on the btu scale so I would think it would carve similar.
    I'm sure somebody has used it and can chime in with an answer based on experience.
    Rock H

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Texas
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    2,245

    Default

    Just looked up the janka scale. I guess it depends on what type of ash it is. Black ash = softer than cherry. white ash = about oak hardness. I've not personally used ash so would not even know how to identify it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Kaukauna, Wisconsin
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    I have carved ash with no problem. Ash is very hard with finer tight grain, which are a few of the reasons it is used in baseball bat and other batons.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Orange County, California
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    Ash is stable, carves very well. I use it allot.
    Experience is a doorway -- Not a final goal.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Jefferson, NC
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    146

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    I use ash on a lot of sports signs, natural finish with a stained oak trim and it works great. Very little sanding clean up.
    Love to Make the sawdust, But I sure Hate to clean it up.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Kiel, Wisconsin
    Posts
    258

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    I made a lot of my own lumber in years past harvesting local white ash trees that had fallen in a local woods, hence, I use a lot of it for carves and furniture.
    Machines well and finishes well, much like white oak.

  8. #8

    Default

    I have used it a lot as well. Carves well.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Provo, UT
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    387

    Default

    Ash works well by hand and machine, resists splitting, and takes screws and nails well. It was the lumber used most by the early auto industry for building the body "skeletons" for the coach-built cars pre- 1930. The tin gets nailed on top.
    Click image for larger version. 

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