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Thread: Trying to use conforming vectors again

  1. #21
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    Dick, I just took a picture of the carving I did yesterday, and a screen shot of the Designer depiction of what it should look like. It is using the 1/16 ball nose bit, which Designer allows to be chosen. I am not yet sure why it turned out this way, but I like the idea of using other bits. I have used end mill bits to cut out letters too, and that worked pretty good. I like the ball nose bits for the smaller size lettering. This is the first time I tried it while using Conforming Vectors.Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by DickB View Post
    If you have an example of a font that did not carve as previewed in Designer, could you post a photo of the carve and screen shot of the Designer view or the mpc? I've never had a mismatch unless the surface of my board was uneven.
    Greg Luckett
    Great Lakes Wood Arts Co.
    Saint Joseph, MI

  2. #22
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    I wonder if this was caused by coming out from under the roller? It would only take a tiny change to create the lighter carving. It would not be as noticeable in the V bit text carvings, but in an etching or very shallow text, it would look just like this.

    .
    Quote Originally Posted by luckettg View Post
    Dick, I just took a picture of the carving I did yesterday, and a screen shot of the Designer depiction of what it should look like. It is using the 1/16 ball nose bit, which Designer allows to be chosen. I am not yet sure why it turned out this way, but I like the idea of using other bits. I have used end mill bits to cut out letters too, and that worked pretty good. I like the ball nose bits for the smaller size lettering. This is the first time I tried it while using Conforming Vectors.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	example in designer.JPG 
Views:	31 
Size:	105.7 KB 
ID:	83084Click image for larger version. 

Name:	example of what was carved.JPG 
Views:	33 
Size:	2.86 MB 
ID:	83085
    Greg Luckett
    Great Lakes Wood Arts Co.
    Saint Joseph, MI

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by luckettg View Post
    I wonder if this was caused by coming out from under the roller? It would only take a tiny change to create the lighter carving. It would not be as noticeable in the V bit text carvings, but in an etching or very shallow text, it would look just like this.

    .
    If that is the case that you are carving with out staying under the roller I would agree.

    I was just getting ready to say that there was an issue a couple of years ago with a few machines that went. They were air carving or carving very shallow. The problems was with some type of machine code. LHR issued a patch that had to be flashed to the card and then installed on the machine.
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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by luckettg View Post
    I am running some more conforming vector test carvings to see if I can figure out why it usually does not work for me.
    Greg, some photos of the test results and mpcs might help diagnose the problem. Other than the text issue it's not clear to me what problem you are experiencing.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by luckettg View Post
    Dick, I just took a picture of the carving I did yesterday, and a screen shot of the Designer depiction of what it should look like. It is using the 1/16 ball nose bit, which Designer allows to be chosen. I am not yet sure why it turned out this way, but I like the idea of using other bits. I have used end mill bits to cut out letters too, and that worked pretty good. I like the ball nose bits for the smaller size lettering. This is the first time I tried it while using Conforming Vectors.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	example in designer.JPG 
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ID:	83084Click image for larger version. 

Name:	example of what was carved.JPG 
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    In Designer I read that using the 1/16" ballnose bit for your text the depth will be .017". If you used the 60 degree V bit instead the depth would be .067" - almost 4 times deeper. Of course that would be much more tolerant of any board movement, if that is what is happening here. Personally, I would be using the 60 degree V bit for that text and actually any small lettering. It will cut significantly deeper than the ballnose bit. But if you want to stick to the ballnose bit I would make sure that the board is not moving and stays under the rollers. That is a possible cause of this problem.

    I think I will try a couple of test carves with a portion of your mpc myself and see what results I get.

    If you're not using a sled, I highly recommend that you do for a number of reasons. I use them on virtually all my projects.

    I'm not sure why Designer allows the use of other bits, but this is how Centerline is described by LHR:
    The Centerline Text Feature adds an additional Rout Mode for the Text Tool feature. This feature uses the 60° and 90° V-groove bits to follow the center of the letters for a clean engraved, v-cut look.

  6. #26
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    Greg,

    Although the Designer will allow you to select other bits when using the centerline function it was designed to use only v-bits. I think this is a programming glitch to even allow other bits to be selected. If you stop to think about it the Designer would have to compensate for the shape of the bit and I don't think it's in the programming to do that. Kearning and other factors would have to be taken into account also. A good example would be to select the 1/2" ogee bit. The bit could not plunge deep enough to show the profile so how would the preview display it? The Designer program just isn't written the same as Aspire. In Aspire, you can even design the shape of your own bit and the preview will display that shape at any depth. The Designer will not. Even in Aspire you can select any bit you want for a v-carve but it just doesn't make sense. A v-carve is, well, v carving and to use a bit other than a v-bit may not give you the expected results.
    Last edited by SteveNelson46; 01-22-2017 at 12:16 PM.
    Steve

  7. #27
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    Most fonts are made with parallel lines instead of one singular line. The spacing between the lines that make up the letter is varied. They get closer together or further apart to achieve that tailored look. As it's carving, v-carve or centerline, the bit is raised or lowered to fill the space between the lines. Otherwise one could just assign a bit to a vector in the shape of a letter but it wouldn’t look the same. How would it look if a bit other than a v-bit is used. It might look okay if a tapered ball nose is used but how deep would the bit need to go to fill the space. That would depend on the size of the tip and the taper on the sides of the ball nose bit and if the program knows what those measurements are. If a straight bit was used how deep would the bit go? If the tip of the bit is wider than the space between the lines it wouldn't carve at all and if it’s narrower, ostensibly it would plunge all the way through the board, There are many factors to consider if a bit other than a v-bit is selected for a v-carve and I don't think the Designer is programmed in detail enough to allow for these factors. V-carving is meant to be used with a v-bit.
    Steve

  8. #28

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    I ran a test using a portion of your mpc (to save carving time) and the result looks like a good match to Designer in my opinion, but you be the judge. Take a look at the detail, such as the squiggly crossbar on the "T" in both Designer and the carving:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here is the same thing using the 60 degree bit for comparison. Notice that the "T" is perfectly straight. The depth also makes the text more visible as there is more shadow (you can see this comparing the two thumbnail pictures - the V text pops):

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I think that these results suggest no issues with Designer, but rather with your machine or your setup. BTW I used a sled for these carvings.

  9. #29
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    Dick, I made a simple sled a couple of years ago to carve on acrylic, but have yet to really make a sled. I agree that I should do so and have had the plans and notes about making them for years now. I would like to learn more about what sleds you are using, if you are willing to share that.

    By the way, I modified the carving and it worked fine. I did not do any lettering on the Hero's Engine; I like your idea of the 60°V-bit.

    Thanks for the help and advice.
    Greg Luckett
    Great Lakes Wood Arts Co.
    Saint Joseph, MI

  10. #30

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    Greg, now we are getting off topic, but no worries.

    I have a few sleds of different sizes that are constructed like this: http://forum.carvewright.com/showthr...highlight=sled. I use 3/4" plywood or MDF as a base, 3/4" x 1" rails top and bottom, and 4" ends. This ensures that the sled always stays under the rollers AND has at least 2" of surface to grip. It keeps the cutting bit at least 1" away from the brass roller which is also a good thing.

    At the top of the sled are two or three thumbscrews. These are used to clamp the workpiece in place. I have a stack of scrap strips of wood to use when my workpiece is narrower than the sled. These are laid in place between the workpiece and the thumb screws. The thumb screws clear the sliding plate, but can get in the way of finding the bit depth if you're not careful. I have my machine set to jog to touch position so that I can touch on the work piece and not the rails, so I simply jog to a position clear of the thumb screws.

    Due to the thickness of the base the machine is unable to determine the board thickness, so you have to enter the thickness when prompted.

    The sleds can accommodate 1/2" workpieces by laying a 1/4" piece of plywood down first. I have a similarly-constructed sled for 1/4" plywood but use masking tape rather than thumbscrews to hold the workpiece in place.

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