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Thread: Trajectory Assertion Error: E24-0505

  1. #1

    Default Trajectory Assertion Error: E24-0505

    Ok, I was attempting to carve a project (.063 depth, 11"x8" carve area, .75" thick board) - I got a random "board may have been removed" error, but since the board had obviously not moved or shifted from where it was supposed to be, I hit "enter" to continue. The cutting chuck finished the pass it was on, and on the way back, the machine flipped out, moved the board laterally (x axis? - table rollers moved) and I got the error in the post title - Trajectory Assertion Error E24-0505

    I've been suffering very minor tracking issues intermittently, and once in awhile (read, not every project) I get a "check tracking roller" or "front roller stuck" error but a quick application of 40psi air to clear any sawdust the dust collector misses and I'm usually back on track. This new error is one that results in not only an error that forces me to stop, but a cut that has destroyed a project.

    Can anyone help with this? Search revealed nothing at all other than "call a nasa engineer"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northern Colorado
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    7,764

    Default

    Houston we have a problem!!

    That is a new error code for me. Ruling out all board issues/problems for the tracking error I would look at/for bad or missing O ring on the brass roller, missing/slipped damper spring under the tracking sensor bracket, outfeed trays raised to high, rolled up sandpaper drive belts, rubber drive belts making contact with the brass roller, stripped X drive gears.

    For constant compression roller errors/warning it could be time to remove/lower the roller to clean the dust out or check for switch adjustment and wire connections. I would also check for incorrect head pressure.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    8,175

    Default

    Maybe head not level? (That error code is not in the list.)

  4. #4

    Default

    Well, I will get on the checks and maintenance and hopefully I can figure it out between the information available here and a phone call to CW as soon as possible (probably not before next week between work schedule and the holiday).

  5. #5

    Default

    Email sent to LHR, looking forward to a response and instructions for shipping the machine in for diagnosis and repair. 97 hours on the usage odometer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    2,401

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    Sounds like a compression roller switch may be failing with an intermittent connection. Have you tried to blow out the sawdust in the switch(s) with compressed air?

    http://www.carvewright.com/assets/se...ng_rollers.pdf
    Last edited by SteveNelson46; 01-25-2016 at 09:46 PM.
    Steve

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveNelson46 View Post
    Sounds like a compression roller switch may be failing with an intermittent connection. Have you tried to blow out the sawdust in the switch with compressed air?

    http://www.carvewright.com/assets/se...ng_rollers.pdf
    I blow out the compression rollers before and after each carve I do - It doesn't seem to have much effect if any.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
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    2,401

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2A Finishing View Post
    I blow out the compression rollers before and after each carve I do - It doesn't seem to have much effect if any.
    You may need to remove the keypad side panel and check the switches manually. Sometimes just blowing compressed air doesn't clean out the compressed sawdust good. The link in my previous post will tell you how. While you have the panel off check the switches for continuity with a multimeter. I cannot say if this is definitely your problem but it's a place to start.

    EDIT: Also be careful using high pressure compressed air. 20-30 psi is more than enough. I just replaced a board sensor for the Veterans Admin. here in Tucson on a machine that had less than 10 hours on it because high pressure air blew sawdust up in the sensor.
    Last edited by SteveNelson46; 01-25-2016 at 10:00 PM.
    Steve

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveNelson46 View Post
    You may need to remove the keypad side panel and check the switches manually. Sometimes just blowing compressed air doesn't clean out the compressed sawdust good. The link in my previous post will tell you how. While you have the panel off check the switches for continuity with a multimeter. I cannot say if this is definitely your problem but it's a place to start.

    EDIT: Also be careful using high pressure compressed air. 20-30 psi is more than enough. I just replaced a board sensor for the Veterans Admin. here in Tucson on a machine that had less than 10 hours on it because high pressure air blew sawdust up in the sensor.
    Honestly, I'm not comfortable disassembling this machine to diagnose and repair it myself - Perhaps I should have spent more on a unit that didn't require me to perform diagnosis and repair on it myself? That said, with less than 100 hrs on the machine, I'm more than happy to just send it to the company that designed and built it for diagnosis and repair so that I can be certain it's done correctly. The situation might be different if I had gone to school for mechanical/electrical engineering rather than law.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    2,401

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2A Finishing View Post
    Honestly, I'm not comfortable disassembling this machine to diagnose and repair it myself - Perhaps I should have spent more on a unit that didn't require me to perform diagnosis and repair on it myself? That said, with less than 100 hrs on the machine, I'm more than happy to just send it to the company that designed and built it for diagnosis and repair so that I can be certain it's done correctly. The situation might be different if I had gone to school for mechanical/electrical engineering rather than law.
    It might be less expensive to find someone in your area to come to you. Sending he unit back to LHR every time something goes wrong is cost prohibitive regardless of your income level. The shipping alone would bankrupt Morgan Chase. Regular maintenance and repair is required quite often.
    Steve

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