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Thread: Using blender 3d to create stl for CW pattern

  1. #141
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    If you have been playing with blender you know the files can get fairly large quick. For example, the model I used to create the following pattern had over 2 million verts and over the 100 meg limit to import the stl into designer.

    A way to work around the limit is to create the model as different parts. This model was split into 4 different objects. The 2 wings, body, and tail. They can be imported separately by using export STL and use selection only button and selecting each piece individually. They can then be merged in designer.

    This model was created using only 4 different feathers that I copied, rotated, and resized to get the varying plumage but because the feathers were fairly detailed the file size got large quick. In the end I created several hundred feathers to create this model.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CW raven.png  

  2. #142
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    Hi Oscar,

    Don't forget you can use MeshLab to reduce file size without visual quality loss (I posted all the details and how-to steps awhile back). That way, you can model freely and without concern for file size. MeshLab to the rescue.
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


    ═══ Links to Patterns & Resources for CompuCarve™ & CarveWright™ ═══

    Visit the CarveBuddy Website for Additional Exclusive Patterns and Resources

  3. #143
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    Michael, thanks. This is for the blender beginners.

    Blender has the same function now. Its the decimate modifier. It allows to reduce vertices by removing subdivision surface modifiers or simplify geometry by removing vertices.

    The problem is you do lose detail. Sometimes its very little and it doesn't matter but sometimes it can visibly modify the model depending on the complexity of the geometry. Both ways are tools in the tools chest. Sometimes one method works and sometimes a different method is needed.

    Since I attempt to model in quads I get tris and n-gons when I decimate the model which 90% of the time is still good enough for patterns but every once in a while I need a different technique.

  4. #144
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    When you have a chance, perform a comparison between Blender and MeshLab (be sure to use the settings I outlined for MeshLab). I'll bet you won't see any loss or modification at all using MeshLab when you reduce the mesh/file size.
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


    ═══ Links to Patterns & Resources for CompuCarve™ & CarveWright™ ═══

    Visit the CarveBuddy Website for Additional Exclusive Patterns and Resources

  5. #145
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    MT, any chance you can repeat or point to our instructions. I read them I think when you posted them, but forgot them when I went to use MeshLab. I will copy and save them this time.
    Oscar, I would like to be a Blender user. Have started many times but always get busy and forget everything by the time I get back to it. I have a For Dummise book on it but it is years old. Amy lasting help you can provide would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
    Clint
    CarveWright StartU team member
    Web Site WWW.clintscustomcarving.com

  6. #146
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    Michael, too be honest I haven't played with meshlab in a few years. I downloaded the newest version and it looks impressive. Ran a quick decimation on a model and again very impressed. I am going to have to create a model that will push both software but were I can see any changes with reduction in geometry. I'll follow up when I complete the test.

    Clint, blender.org just announced with the next major release (2.9) they will be releasing pared down versions of blender for niche processes/operations. So the modeling version will only have the tools needed for modeling so a lot of the additional functionality, while still there, will be hidden. This will really simplify learning and using the software. Unfortunately, it will a few more months or longer for 2.9 to come out. The next release is 2.89 which will have some good updates but will still have all the bells and whistles that can be really confusing. It is a monster to learn but once you get past that first cliff the next major learning points aren't quite so bad. I say that but I am having a heck of time trying to learn materials and application of said materials. A 3d object can have up to 5 material layers applied to it to provide realism when rendered. In pattern development I don't use materials at all.

  7. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by cestout View Post
    MT, any chance you can repeat or point to our instructions. I read them I think when you posted them, but forgot them when I went to use MeshLab. I will copy and save them this time...
    Thanks
    Clint
    Hi Clint,

    Here is the link for you:

    https://forum.carvewright.com/showth...172#post261172
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


    ═══ Links to Patterns & Resources for CompuCarve™ & CarveWright™ ═══

    Visit the CarveBuddy Website for Additional Exclusive Patterns and Resources

  8. #148
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    Michael, I am super impressed by the new meshlab. I think it will be a part of my modeling pipeline. Its decimation feature is more optimized than blenders.

    There are changes to the geometry when any decimation is applied. I did a crazy test. Created a tessellation model with 24M vertices. I then decimated it to 3.9M vertices using meshlab's quadratic edge collapse.

    You can see the pronounced changes in the geometry and fine detail features you lose during decimation (simplification).

    For pattern builders using blender these changes using decimation are mostly subtle with a dense mesh model but they are very pronounced in a less dense mesh. You need to balance the geometry with the outcome you need for the pattern.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails tesselation test 1.png   teselation test2.png  
    Last edited by oscarl48; 07-14-2017 at 11:19 AM.

  9. #149
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    Yeah. That test is a bit crazy alright!

    Try doing something more normal. Like a scroll, family crest, dog, horse, or anything but that.
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


    ═══ Links to Patterns & Resources for CompuCarve™ & CarveWright™ ═══

    Visit the CarveBuddy Website for Additional Exclusive Patterns and Resources

  10. #150
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    lol. You are right. As long as you have a medium density on the model geometry you will never see the difference carving with a 1/16 in bit.

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