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Thread: 3d Scanner - What do you use?

  1. #1
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    Default 3d Scanner - What do you use?

    I'm trying to make architectural reproductions of some old wood corbels, rosettes, etc. Some I can remove but some are so delicate that the scanning probe is damaging them. Is anyone using a 3d scanner to capture objects and then importing through the STL Importer or other software? If so, what scanner are you using? I'm interested in either a portable or desktop unit, and prefer a flatbed style as most of the objects don't require a full 360 scan.
    Tracy

    World's largest supplier of custom carved firewood.

  2. #2
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    I would think it easier and less expensive to make a negative mold with, say modeling clay, and make a plaster reproduction. Then use the scanning probe. I got some of the glop that dentist use for impressions (a reason I don't like to go there) to try, but haven't yet.
    Clint
    CarveWright StartU team member
    Web Site WWW.clintscustomcarving.com

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcough3475 View Post
    I'm trying to make architectural reproductions of some old wood corbels, rosettes, etc. Some I can remove but some are so delicate that the scanning probe is damaging them. Is anyone using a 3d scanner to capture objects and then importing through the STL Importer or other software? If so, what scanner are you using? I'm interested in either a portable or desktop unit, and prefer a flatbed style as most of the objects don't require a full 360 scan.
    Hi Tracy,

    I use the NextEngine laser scanner on some of the antique wood carvings I am converting to digital models and ptns. I also just use good photos to model from (either instead of, or in conjunction with, the 3D scans).

    The June Project of the month post has some photos of the original wood carvings of heads that I scanned, then created relief models of just the faces, using the laser scanner, Sculptor, Aspire, and Slicer, and STL importer. Most jobs like this require me to use multiple software to achieve the result I want.

    Here are some pics of a flourish I modeled from another antique carving. In this particular case, I just scanned half of the carving (because it is symmetrical). I did NOT bother to clean up the scan for this model creation procedure...I just used the scan as a guide for creating cross sections and sweep rails for the model building.

    EDIT: I just recalled I made this from a casting made from an antique plaster mold...not the original carving that was used to create the plaster mold. I included two more photos...the antique mold and the casting I made...the casting is what I scanned.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails antiuqe-plaster-mold-from-carving.png   casting-from-mold.png   laser-scanned-half.png   Corner_Flourish_1355JW98x52_front.png  

    Corner_Flourish_1355JW98x52_iso.png  
    Last edited by mtylerfl; 08-04-2015 at 04:28 PM.
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


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  4. #4
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    Tracy,

    Another example of a 3D scan I did awhile back. I posted about this on another forum when talking about the NextEngine desktop scanner.

    I stopped in a consignment shop on a whim one day, and spotted a table full of antique miniature ceramic duck decoys. I bought two of them and immediately scanned one that same evening. Most of the details were just painted on, but the actual ceramic relief detail was captured faithfully. I scanned at a medium-high resolution then fused and filled the mesh, then used the polish feature in the NextEngine software to smooth everything nicely. I saved the scan as an STL file and imported it into the CW STL Importer. If I scanned at the highest resolution of the add-on HD Pro software (a $995 addition which I think is a requirement for anyone planning to do a lot of high-quality scanning), it would have picked up the relief layers of the paint, too (but, I didn't want the highest resolution for this duck decoy).

    With the add-on software, you will have the capability of detail that is found on other scanning systems selling for about $25k!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Duck_1_T7.png   duck-scanned-and-polished.png   duck-in-CW-STL-importer.png   NextEngine-desktop-laser-scanner.png  

    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


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  5. #5
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    Thanks Clint and Michael. I've considered making a mold/casting but some of the pieces are still installed in the building and not an easy task.

    I like what I read about the Next Gen scanner. It's a little pricey for me right now but looks like what I need long term. I'm connected to a couple contractors that do historic remodels and they are asking if it can be done quickly (and always cheaply). Fortunately they want it done accurately and of good quality (hardwoods, not particle board or cheap softwoods). But Michael I'm glad to see that you're have success with it.

    Thanks again gents!
    Tracy

    World's largest supplier of custom carved firewood.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcough3475 View Post
    Thanks Clint and Michael. I've considered making a mold/casting but some of the pieces are still installed in the building and not an easy task.

    I like what I read about the Next Gen scanner. It's a little pricey for me right now but looks like what I need long term. I'm connected to a couple contractors that do historic remodels and they are asking if it can be done quickly (and always cheaply). Fortunately they want it done accurately and of good quality (hardwoods, not particle board or cheap softwoods). But Michael I'm glad to see that you're have success with it.

    Thanks again gents!
    Hi Tracy,

    I think your contractors are being a bit unrealistic about doing this type of work for them "cheaply". They have to be educated that this is something that cannot be done by just anyone and that it takes considerable skill and know-how to create accurate digital reproductions. So, that's something you'll need to address at some future date when you are ready to jump into this kind of work.

    As far as the items "still installed in the building", there are several approaches to overcoming this obstacle...

    1) Purchase special silicons and plasters from http://www.smooth-on.com/ to create molds and castings for scanning later off-site. The Smooth-On website has quite a few tutorial videos on how this is done and what products you'll need. Again, this is NOT cheap...material costs can be high and need to be passed along to the contractor (s)

    2) Take a look at my Tips & Tricks about scanning with the probe. One of them shows how I made a mold and "casting" of a decorative carving from my 1865 antique piano. I used Crayola Model Magic air-dry clay and Sculpey bake-hard clay. The PDF describes the process.

    3) If/when you invest in a NextEngine laser scanner, it is portable. As long as you have a really good/powerful laptop, you can go on the road to do on-site scanning (I've used a Dell M6500 workstation laptop and more recently, a Dell M6800 workstation laptop with 32 GB RAM). You'll also need to be sure you get the HD Pro scanning software add-on so you can scan sections of objects that may be mounted on a wall or scan a statue or whatever.

    I'll be doing option 3 myself, in September. I'll be traveling to an antique dealer in Michigan to scan antique items that are too large to ship safely. Once I have the scans, I can process them after returning home.
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


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  7. #7
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    Architectural stuff ain't cheap. That is how I got my second machine - first part of a several part job. Included some 6ft by 6in by 1in molding - 18 hr. carve and all the card could hold. I used the probe to copy samples he sent me. That was back in 1.184 days so CarveWright didn't have all the software tools. Still looking for another job like that.
    Clint
    CarveWright StartU team member
    Web Site WWW.clintscustomcarving.com

  8. #8
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    I just got this notification of a free webinar on Aug 11th entitled "3D Scanning Basics" using the NextEngine. This will give you an excellent overview on how it works! Here is a registration link:

    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/reg...87161056095746
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


    ═══ Links to Patterns & Resources for CompuCarve™ & CarveWright™ ═══

    Visit the CarveBuddy Website for Additional Exclusive Patterns and Resources

  9. #9
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    Thanks again gents. And I guess my use of the word cheaply may be taken in the wrong context. Scanning/carving by modern techniques would be less expensive than having them reproduced by hand, if they could even find someone that still can master that art.
    Tracy

    World's largest supplier of custom carved firewood.

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