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Thread: Tool safety

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Redmond, Or
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    360

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    This makes me think about my shop teacher some 50 years ago. Before each class started he would hold up his hand and say "I don't want this happening to you, be careful."
    I think of that almost every time I start up one of my power tools.
    You and your son will both be in my thoughts and prayers.

    Mike
    All Gave Some,
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bonney Lake, Washington, United States, 113160055365328, Bonney Lake, Washington
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    1,803

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    Thanks for the reminder, it can happen so fast. I cut my finger on my band saw a few weeks ago and it is still healing. My prayers are going to your son and your family.
    Tom Watson
    Two CW's and D.C.-Top Mount Insert @ Ringneckblues.com Get the dust out!!
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Northern Utah
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    Prayers to you and your son.

    I was asked once what the most dangerous tool in my shop was. Of course I said the table saw. I was then told no, it is the one you are currently using. That got me to thinking about it and you know what? He was 100% correct. Sure the table saw is dangerous, but not so much if you aren't using it at the time.

    One of the tools I purchased was from http://www.microjig.com/. I use it every time I have a chance to. So much so I purchased two of them. Not only does it keep my hands farther from the blade, it definately gives me greater control of what I am doing. I did use it once without checking it for clearance. But after purchasing a replacement part I make it a point to check it each usage. Oh, BTW, it is not just used on my table saw.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brunswick, GA
    Posts
    8,097

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    What is it you purchased? Looks like they have several products.

    I recently purchased a Thin Rip Tablesaw Jig from Rockler http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...6&site=ROCKLER
    Makes ripping thin strips more accurate and safer.
    Last edited by mtylerfl; 03-14-2013 at 03:32 PM.
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Northern Utah
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    550

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    I purchased the GRR-Rripper. I should have used this link http://www.microjig.com/products/grr-ripper/index.shtml. I can groove dowels easily as well as easily cut 1/8" strips. I have had wood try to kickback on occasion but the GRR-Ripper maintains total control of the wood. In fact, I very ever rarely make a rip cut without it. I use their splitter as well, but it is not quite as important to me as the GRR-Ripper. Maybe because it just sits there unobtrusively doing it's job and I don't pay much attention of it.
    Last edited by Deolman; 03-14-2013 at 04:14 PM. Reason: typo fix

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Brunswick, GA
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    Thank you for the info! That's good to know.
    Michael T
    Happy Carving!


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  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Conroe, Texas, United States
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    I just got off the phone with Steve at my local WOODCRAFT on 1960 in Houston.

    Steve put my name on one of the Micro Jig GRR-Ripper System
    Will pick it up on Saturday.

    This forum is so much help.

    Thank you Deolman and you Michael for talking about both systems.
    Happy Carving

    Robert D.
    rcdages

    CarveWright START U Team Member.

    The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut
    that held it's ground.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northern Colorado
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    7,655

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    I just got this in my email today and thought it might fit in here..

    http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/s...nt=Safety+Tips
    RingNeckBlues
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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southgate, Mi
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    Last Christmas I was pulling an all-nighter trying to finish some lithopane orders. I was making the lightframe boxes and using 1/4" luaun for the back. I had a 4'x4' piece that I had painted white for reflective. I napped while the paint dried. When I awoke it was early morning and bitter cold. I figured the easiest way to cut it up would to be to venture out to the summer (unheated) workshop and use the big tablesaw. I ripped it in half and had two 2' sections 4' long. I then set the fence at 12" and proceeded to crosscut the 4' long sections. The thin board was warped and I was bending it flat as I passed it through the blade. This meant nothing was holding down the part between the fence and the blade. Knowing it was a dangerous cut. I stopped and said the woodworker prayer. Sure enough as the blade finished the cut, the piece lifted on the blade and it kicked back with terminal velocity. It slammed into the width of my right hand (as I was pushing was that hand) then deflected off and nicked the top of my forehead, barely leaving a scratch. The pain in my hand was so intense, I fell to my knees. It was a few moments before I had the nerve to look at it. Although bruised and sore, it was unharmed. It was several minutes before I could get up the nerve to get up and go in the house. But while I sat there on my knees, holding my hand in pain, I thanked God for not taking my hand! The next day I re-installed the splitter and vowed to never take it off again! I have been looking at DIY gripper plans. But I think I will save my pennies and buy the real thing!
    "Carved with Love"

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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Northern Utah
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    550

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    Be sure and get the handle bridge kit. By nature of the design it makes it better to push the wood as it helps to keep the wood against the fence. Yes it is an extra cost but still worth it.

    If you do get the GRR-Ripper, I would be interested in your comments.

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