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Thread: Wood Type

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Langley BC
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    Default Wood Type

    Just got my unit 3 weeks ago and this maybe a dumb question but for doing basic signs ( address's ) what type of wood gives the best finsh ( less sanding ).

  2. #2
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    Feb 2008
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    Indian Lake, Ohio - Rts 33 & 235
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    Default Best wood and best cutting speed

    Quote Originally Posted by markfettback@me.com View Post
    Just got my unit 3 weeks ago and this maybe a dumb question but for doing basic signs ( address's ) what type of wood gives the best finish ( less sanding ).
    The question is not that simple.
    You need to consider the carving to be made and the wood quality.
    Here is a link to a chart of some of the basic woods, showing the ability to be carved.
    http://forum.carvewright.com//attach...2&d=1205283058

    The sanding question may depend upon the combination od wood involved, the sharpness of the bit, and the speed of travel across the wood. I use the "Optimal" setting as I load the memory card, which gives me a finer carve, resulting in less sanding. I stay away from Oak on any project where I use and raster pattern, due to the loose grain of that wood.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Default

    hi and welcome to the forum!

    As Bud already stated, the answer is a bit complicated.... but to give you a few, I very much like carving in hard woods with tight grains such as maple, mesquite, cherry (though it burns a bit) and walnut. Most exotic woods can be carved quite nicely, but are pricy in larger quantities (rosewood, the ebonies, zircote, bubinga etc)

    Less-hard woods or woods with an open grain can give you mixed results, but I've still found them to work well-- (mahogany, the oaks/pecan/butternut)

    Traditional softwoods can be carved but will require either more care or some sanding (d fir, most pines, basswood, kauri, etc)

    I hope this helped,
    Lawrence

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    New Jersey 07748
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    Default

    Generally speaking,,, Hard woods carve cleaner.. Pine gets a lot of what we call fuzzies... But There is the cost of hardwood verses pine.. I've carved lots of walnut and mahogany, both perform well, with very little sanding needed... I've carved various other hardwoods with very good results... Cocabola, bloodwood, maple, Jatoba, Bamboo... etc... But when it comes to basic stuff, I use plain old Pine... With a dremel an exacto knife and some sandpaper it cleans up pretty good... You can also burn the fuzzies with a propane torch, just don't over due it and char the wood... Then most of it easily shaves away with and exacto...
    Mans Quest for knowledge,,, means he'll always find a way !!

  5. #5
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    Aug 2008
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    Default

    There is also the option of a sanding mop to clean up your carves.

    As well as, the quality setting you select.
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  6. #6
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    Default

    I agree with the wood mentioned, but would like to add Purple Heart very hard and very little clean up.

    Leo

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Jacksonville Beach, Fl
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    Default

    If you can find a source European Beech carves GREAT!

  8. #8
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    May 2011
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    NW Arkansas
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    Default

    I love using cherry and walnut. I've even had good results with regular pine under certain conditions. With pine, you have to run the carve on optimal and your carving elements need to have draft on them. Any hard edges will fuzz up for sure. Oak works pretty good, but it does have kind of rough surface to it sometimes after a carve. For out door signs, I've used a lot of locally cut red cedar with centerline text and they turn out fine. Raster carves on cedar is kind of iffy though, tends to chip out a lot.

  9. Default

    One wood that is often overlooked, that I like to use is aromatic cedar. It has good density and hardness and carves almost as clean as walnut. And it is fairly inexpensive. It can add a nice rustic quality to your work.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails style1boldmillcreek.jpg   style2boldtrain.jpg  

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Las Vegas NV
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryT View Post
    One wood that is often overlooked, that I like to use is aromatic cedar. It has good density and hardness and carves almost as clean as walnut. And it is fairly inexpensive. It can add a nice rustic quality to your work.
    This is a pretty wood. I like the dark reddest color
    Leo Davenport
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