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Thread: Home built airplane

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pipe Creek, TX
    Posts
    63

    Default Home built airplane

    A fellow aviator and I are building a home built airplane and had difficulty finding someone in our area to cut the wing ribs for us. CW to the rescue!! Here is the pattern we made. The wood used is 1/4" aircraft grade spruce plywood. When the plane is finished, I will follow up with pictures.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by rockflier; 03-20-2011 at 04:40 PM.
    The problem with communications is the illusion they have occurred.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bonney Lake, Washington, United States, 113160055365328, Bonney Lake, Washington
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    1,803

    Default

    WOW that's great. So much the CW can do, it only takes imagination.
    Tom Watson
    Two CW's and D.C.-Top Mount Insert @ Ringneckblues.com Get the dust out!!
    50" X 48" PDJ Pilot Pro CNC http://www.pdjinc.com

    Check out my Facebook page for current carvings at http://www.facebook.com/signsinwood

    Watsons Wooden Words http://www.signsinwood.com & Messages in Wood http://www.messagesinwood.com/

  3. #3

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    Keep us up to date on your project!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Unionville, NY
    Posts
    280

    Default

    Wood love to see the results myself.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Snellville, GA
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    1,477

    Default

    I really hope this project flies . . . Sorry, I just couldn't resist.
    Fair winds,

    Capt Bruce
    Kinney deSigns http://kinneydesigns.us
    CarveWright START U Team Member.

    30 year USN SEABEE, the original Weapons of Mass Construction.
    Designer Ver 1.187 and 2.007, Ver.3.001 One 2009 B CW w ROCK and a 5th Year Anniversary C CW
    Rotary Jig, 2D and 3D, Tracing Probe, DFX and STL Importers

    .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NE PA USA
    Posts
    9,891

    Default

    I would hate to see this project crash too....

    Another idea for cutting this stuff is do like I do the the plastic tags. Use a carrier board and double sided tape. Set up the project with a outline of the part and assign the 1/4 inch bull nose bit to Designer and set the depth to .026. NO Tabs with this method.

    Use a 1/16 inch end mill bit to cut the parts out. By telling the machine you are using a 1/4 inch bit the feed rate will lock into 1st gear.

    If you cut them with the 1/8 inch bit watch it cut. It will do the corners slow then speed up. That speed up can sometimes give you problems as the bit cannot cut fast enough and it pushes the wood.

    AL
    Favorite Saying.... "It's ALL About the Brass Roller"..... And "Use MASKING TAPE" for board skipping in the X or breaking bits.

    Follow ME on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Accoun...50019051727074

    www.PoconoDigitalWoodshop.com

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pipe Creek, TX
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Cpt. Bruce and Digital. I forgot to mention that I used a sled for the carve, used the 1/8" cutting bit. I first made a jig to hold the entire piece of plywood and assigned a carve depth of .3. That way the plywood would not splinter with the cut. I fabricated 4 swivel pieces, one on each side of the plywood directly over the tabs to ensure the piece would not rise or slip. This is the second home built we have made, the first was great. After flying the 757-200 for several years, these small planes have restored the fun of flying. As an old Army 1SG turned aviator the CW has also restored the fun of wood working. Thanks for the tips and encouragement. We finished all the metal work, courtesy of my partner, and are ready to build the wings. More pics as we finish more. I will take some pics of the metal work finished and attach them sometime this next week.
    The problem with communications is the illusion they have occurred.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    284

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockflier View Post
    Cpt. Bruce and Digital. I forgot to mention that I used a sled for the carve, used the 1/8" cutting bit. I first made a jig to hold the entire piece of plywood and assigned a carve depth of .3. That way the plywood would not splinter with the cut. I fabricated 4 swivel pieces, one on each side of the plywood directly over the tabs to ensure the piece would not rise or slip. This is the second home built we have made, the first was great. After flying the 757-200 for several years, these small planes have restored the fun of flying. As an old Army 1SG turned aviator the CW has also restored the fun of wood working. Thanks for the tips and encouragement. We finished all the metal work, courtesy of my partner, and are ready to build the wings. More pics as we finish more. I will take some pics of the metal work finished and attach them sometime this next week.
    Being a homebuilder myself, I'm curious, what are you building?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pipe Creek, TX
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chkorte View Post
    Being a homebuilder myself, I'm curious, what are you building?
    CH, this one is the Bekeng Deuce, the first one we built was the Midget Mustang, 200 h.p.. Great flying little plane.
    Last edited by rockflier; 03-21-2011 at 03:57 AM.
    The problem with communications is the illusion they have occurred.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pipe Creek, TX
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Here are jpegs of the gussets for wing ribs and flaps. Using 1/16" mahogany plywood mounted on a MDF carrier, we used masking tape on each end to hold the 24" x 12" sheets down, used the 1/16" carving bit with a carve depth of 3/32". There were 60 pieces of each gusset. Last time it took us 6 months of drawing, cutting with an exacto knife, and sanding. The entire carve was done in an afternoon!! The wing ribs use the Clark Y airfoil design. Correction on previous spellings, the craft is the Bakeng deuce, designed by the Boeing aeronautical engineer, Jerry Bakeng.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by rockflier; 03-22-2011 at 02:13 PM.
    The problem with communications is the illusion they have occurred.

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