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Jossef
05-13-2008, 08:03 AM
I have ordered the new QC that I broke and I am trying to wait patiently for it. I only got about 5 minutes use on the CW before it broke. My question is, I am sure I need to remove the cutting truck to change the QC. Is there a trick to getting the screws lose. They are very tight and I am afraid of stripping them out.

Thanks,
Joe

Kenm810
05-13-2008, 08:20 AM
No! leave the truck alone
The QC Chuck is removed from the machine while the carving head and Z truck remain in place.
There are several posts and photos that will explain how to remove a damaged chuck.
How do you change out the router quick Changer (http://www.carvewright.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2040&highlight=Quick+Change+Chuck)
How do I (dis)assemble the Quick Change chuck? (http://www.carvewright.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3065&highlight=Quick+Change+Chuck)

oclatta
05-13-2008, 08:40 AM
After you have gone into a cussing fit trying to change the QC with the tools LHR sends you, send an e-mail to rjustice at CW_Parts@yahoo.com. He has developed tools that make the QC changing easier and sells them at a reasonable price. Also, remember to heat the chuck using a heat gun. Protect the plastic gears and rubber belts behind the chuck from too much heat.

Jeff_Birt
05-13-2008, 09:06 AM
The trick to changing the QC is the proper application of heat. I would suspect that most folks are afraid of getting things too hot. I would suggest using a heat gun for the job, most hair dryers will not be up to the task.

Point your heat gun so that it is at a slight downward angle directed at the top of the QC. Do not point it up towards the Z-truck. The goal is to heat the chuck NOT the spindle shaft.

With the heat gun about 4" away from the chuck, heat the chuck for about 20 seconds in the same spot. Turn the chuck about 1/4 turn, heat for about 10 more seconds and repeat until you have the whole chuck heated up evenly. Try to loosen the chuck, if it won't budge, apply heat and rotate for about another 30 seconds, and try again. keep heating and trying until you get it.

Remember that the part you are taking off, the chuck, is upside down! That means you need to turn it clockwise when looking at it from above (so if you could somehow fit your head between the truck and sandpaper belts you would see that the chuck was indeed turning CCW).

Jossef
05-13-2008, 11:24 AM
Thanks all again for the help. I was sure the truck had to come off. I am afraid of putting too much side load on the assy when I go to remove the QC. I will be sure to use Jeff's tips on applying heat.

Jossef
05-15-2008, 09:02 AM
I was really surprised yesterday when I got home to find that my new QC was waiting for me. I also found out that the wrench is on backorder, so I have ordered the wrench kit from RJustice. Hopefully in just a few days I will be carving again.....wait, I mean carving for the first time!!!

rjustice
05-16-2008, 10:55 PM
Thanks all again for the help. I was sure the truck had to come off. I am afraid of putting too much side load on the assy when I go to remove the QC. I will be sure to use Jeff's tips on applying heat.

Joseff,
Your concern with putting too much side load on the Z truck is a very valid concern. Your tools will arive tomorrow, and when you go to use them, you will find that the thin wrench will rest on the shelf on the machine by itself. You can then use both hands to loosen the square tool. You will use one hand to hold the square tool at the pivot point, and the other to apply pressure to the end of the boxed end wrench. By approaching it this way you really wont be applying much pressure to the Z truck or the guide bearings.
This info is in the instructions sent in the package, but i thought it was worth sharing on the forum as well..

Good luck!

Ron

Jossef
05-17-2008, 12:15 PM
I just now got the wrench and square drive. I have read the instructions. I want to make sure I understand them completly. It says to turn the wrench counter clockwise. That seems opposite to me. To make sure I understand, do I move the wrench from the keypad side to the other side or towards the keypad side?

fwharris
05-17-2008, 03:40 PM
Jossef,

The treads on the shaft are reverse from a standard. Left handed vs. right handed as Jeff has stated:

Remember that the part you are taking off, the chuck, is upside down! That means you need to turn it clockwise when looking at it from above (so if you could somehow fit your head between the truck and sandpaper belts you would see that the chuck was indeed turning CCW).__________________

hotpop
05-17-2008, 03:43 PM
Jossef

It is a common right hand thread. Heat the chuck with a hair dryer. Trap the 7/8" wrench so it does not rotate. Handle should face of machine toward the keypad. Rotate the square end drive tool counter-wise.

Jossef
05-17-2008, 06:37 PM
Thanks for the help, although the last two posts were opposite of each other. One said they are standard right hand threads, while the other says they are left hand threads. Which are they? Do I turn the wrench or the drive?

rjustice
05-17-2008, 09:30 PM
Joseff,
they are standard right hand threads.... turn the small square drive tool counterclockwise to loosen.

Jossef
05-17-2008, 09:34 PM
I think I miss read the two posts about the threads on the QC. I believe they were both saying the same thing. All is good, actually all is great!! I changed the QC, and cut my first piece. It was just a shell that I got off the software. It turned out great!! Tonight I will be making some new patterns and really get into carving. Thanks to everyone for getting me going.

rjustice
05-17-2008, 09:35 PM
Joseff,
Glad all went well for you. Have fun, and let the sawdust fly!


Happy Carving,

Ron

Jossef
05-17-2008, 10:22 PM
Thanks, I will. What is your suggestion for bit choice? I used an 1/8" bit tonight, but it came out a little rough. I thought I had another 1/16" bit, but can't find it. I cut some pine tonight, but plan to go to using red oak next.

mtylerfl
05-17-2008, 11:11 PM
Thanks, I will. What is your suggestion for bit choice? I used an 1/8" bit tonight, but it came out a little rough. I thought I had another 1/16" bit, but can't find it. I cut some pine tonight, but plan to go to using red oak next.

Jossef,

You will "always" use the 1/16" bit for carving raster patterns - you will not normally use anything else (except perhaps, in extremely special circumstances that are far from the norm). By default, the machine will automatically assign the 1/16" bit to all raster carving operations. You do not assign the bit - the software has already done that for you.

The 1/8" bit is used when performing cut paths and other straight cuts, such as narrow, decorative dados and such. The 1/8" bit is certainly not designed for carving patterns.

By the way, just to "head things off at the pass" you do NOT assign a bit when using the software's cut path feature - the machine will automatically assign the 1/8" straight bit and you should not interfere with that.

Hope that helps you.

Jossef
05-18-2008, 12:36 AM
Yes, that does help a lot. I need to either find my 1/16 or buy another one. I wish I could get one at a store!!

rjustice
05-18-2008, 12:55 PM
Joseff,
I have them in stock if you need one... they are 4 fluted tools, and will leave a very nice finish. See the list that i sent you in Email when you purchased the QC removal tools. Details are in that list..

Ron

DocWheeler
11-22-2008, 07:46 PM
I dug up this old thread since it was relevant.

The story starts with some major problems a month or so ago where I had to replace my Y motor and all 8 rollers. I bought a bunch of "replacement" parts while I was at it - good thing.

Today I was re-carving the runners for Michael's great sleigh project because my machine moves the cut outs about 1/16" toward the bottom consistently. Since the runners are positioned with one right-side-up and the other upside-down, there was too much sanding to make them match and look good (first aggravation).

I got my first "Rear roller compresses" message, so I took the side off and blew a bunch of dust out (aggravation two). I have no idea how to solve this problem without compressed air!

While the side was off, I vacuumed it out and found the air-deflector that was supposed to divert the air coming out of the head-piece toward the carving area, the tab to hold it on was broken. I tried to double-stick-tape it without success. There was not enough material to use a 1/2" bolt that I first thought of using before I settled on just using some JB Weld (aggravation three).

While the epoxy was setting, I thought I'd oil the chuck and clean it with a Q-tip. I even went so far as to blow air into the top of it after "snapping" it for a few minutes. That was maybe not a good thing to have done.

For the first time ever, the bit did not snap in tightly as I started the carve. I had to push the collar down hard to get the bit tight. About 30% into the carve, I got a line with the later carved part a little deeper. That didn't sink in until it had carved a little more and I realized that I needed to check the bit. Too late, I had BB marks and I could not get the QC to function properly (aggravation four).

Luckily, I had ordered an extra QC so all I had to do was install it. This went better that expected since I had the piece that Ron Justice makes to fit the square opening where the flex-shaft goes. Next to reinstall another bit adaptor on the bit – again no problem using my handy-dandy heat gun. However, I moved and knocked the hot heat-gun end into the yellow plastic coiled hose on the air compressor, I noticed that I had done that when I heard the air rushing out of the resulting hole (aggravation five). The heat gun immediately looked like a “dammit” tool, but the urge to throw it had subsided before I even got it unplugged!

Okay, now I have that off my chest.

Kenm810
11-22-2008, 07:59 PM
Very good Ken,
A constructive Rant with a step by step explanation and solution to each (aggravation).
It makes for good reading, with hints of what to expext
as you open your tool box and the lid of your machine.