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Chay
05-05-2011, 04:00 PM
Hi all, love this forum.

Can one use centre line text software for other than lettering? Will it follow the center line of a drawing say for chip carving?

Chay

SteveEJ
05-05-2011, 04:03 PM
Vectors can be followed by putting lines where you want them in Designer and assigning one of the built on bits. Also, if you have designs in the form of Vector drawings, they can, if in DXF format, be imported via the addon DXF Importer. They make for very nice carvings. You will be surprised what can be done.. Search for DXF or Vectors. There is a area that has just what you might be looking for.

dougmsbbs
05-05-2011, 04:58 PM
You can also create a font with the image of what you want in it, and the center line will cut it. Before we had the DXF importer this was one way we used to get line drawing into Designer. I still use it now and again.

lawrence
05-05-2011, 08:10 PM
You can also create a font with the image of what you want in it, and the center line will cut it. Before we had the DXF importer this was one way we used to get line drawing into Designer. I still use it now and again.

+1

Lawrence

Chay
05-05-2011, 09:24 PM
44345
Thanks,
This is the type of V bit carving I would like to do where the bit starts at 0 in the z axis and gradually goes deeper

Chay

AskBud
05-05-2011, 09:49 PM
44345
Thanks,
This is the type of V bit carving I would like to do where the bit starts at 0 in the z axis and gradually goes deeper

Chay
Chay,
Your attachment failed.
Try again, but click on ADVANCED (in the lower right corner) and then go to "Manage Attachments".
I think what you want to do is highlight the vector and then click the "Profile" Icon and select what you wish (there is a "reverse" option if you need it). On my screen the Profile Icon is just right of the bit Icon.
AskBud

bjbethke
05-06-2011, 02:14 AM
44345
Thanks,
This is the type of V bit carving I would like to do where the bit starts at 0 in the z axis and gradually goes deeper

Chay
I could not see your attachment, but all you need to do is make a Chip Carving into a dingbat image and carve it with centerline. You can also draw an image in the CW designer program and select a depth profile. The black part of the image will carve into the board.

Chay
05-06-2011, 06:56 AM
2nd attempting to upload attachment (jpg)

I don't have the Center line software yet just wondering if I should buy it for this purpose or if there is another option. Although I have been following this forum for a while I haven't been carving due to replacement of chuck. (Used machine)It's working great now and I'm impressed. I will certainly buy a new one when this one has issues.

Thankfull for your help
Chay

SteveEJ
05-06-2011, 08:26 AM
For that type of carving I would use the DXF importer with Conforming Vectors. It is a bit more than Centerline but adds flexibility and speed.
Dingbats and Centerline are great but require designing in a font editor so the design work comes either from that or in Designer itself. Also, there are TONS of designs, like the one above, available in EPS, AI or DXF format on the web.EPS and AI can be converted to DXF rather easily.
Hope this helps..

bjbethke
05-06-2011, 08:47 AM
2nd attempting to upload attachment (jpg)

I don't have the Center line software yet just wondering if I should buy it for this purpose or if there is another option. Although I have been following this forum for a while I haven't been carving due to replacement of chuck. (Used machine)It's working great now and I'm impressed. I will certainly buy a new one when this one has issues.

Thankfull for your help
Chay

You can use the Depth Profile function, but you would need to draw each line and then select the profile. This is a vector carving and uses the V or the Ball bit, and it carves centerline. There are a limited numbers of profiles with the CW program.
It would work better if you use a line drawing. And use the CW centerline function with a font Dingbat image.
To make your image in a font, you would need to split up the image. There is too much data to make it in one image font image. The CW unit will not load the font image if it is too large.
The centerline function carves the center of the line and adjusts the width and depth by the width of the line. The black part of the drawing carves into the board.

bjbethke
05-06-2011, 08:55 AM
For that type of carving I would use the DXF importer with Conforming Vectors. It is a bit more than Centerline but adds flexibility and speed.
Dingbats and Centerline are great but require designing in a font editor so the design work comes either from that or in Designer itself. Also, there are TONS of designs, like the one above, available in EPS, AI or DXF format on the web.EPS and AI can be converted to DXF rather easily.
Hope this helps..

Steve, I don't think you can get a depth and width (Chip Carving) with a DXF image. ??? I think you only get the outside of the image line.

AskBud
05-06-2011, 10:10 AM
As others have suggested your attachment may be too ornate and/or too large to be handled by Centerline.

Centerline is an add-on for TEXT carving, mostly, using the V-bit or Ball-nose bit. You have little or no control over the depth of Centerline carve, as it is dependent upon the font selected as well as the size you make the text (even if it is a font character you design and import). It all depends upon the width and intensity of the font lines!

Depth Profile, may be applied to any vector but may not totally allow that depicted in your attachment (you could play with it and see). Highlighting a profiled vector line and using the "Rout Tool" allows you to change/adjust where the meat of the profile takes place.

DXF, on the other hand, may be what you really wish to have.
Here is a link to the LHR tutorials on DXF. The 1st lesson may give you insight on everything you ask. The other two will expand your horizons.
http://www.carvewright.com/2010CWweb/dxftutors.htm
AskBud

Chay
05-06-2011, 10:37 AM
Thank you all. I will review, watch the videos and decide. I may just do them by hand.
Much appreciated,
Chay