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Thread: Food safe wood stain and sealer?

  1. #1

    Default Food safe wood stain and sealer?


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    Hi, can any one recommend me some food safe wood stain and sealer and where can I find them? I know of something called milk paint but looking for something more like natural finish.
    Thanks
    HT

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    South East, Michigan
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    6,119

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    HT, Here's a couple sites where you could start looking,

    Non-Toxic Salad Bowl Finish

    This is a high quality, non-toxic kitchenware finish.
    It is food safe when dry and is highly resistant to food and water stains.
    We recommend this finish as one to use for craft show kitchenware as it can be touched up with mineral

    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st..._Finishes?Args=
    http://www.woodturner-russ.com/fsoriginal3a.html
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails salad-finish_l.jpg  
    Last edited by Kenm810; 02-25-2008 at 04:27 PM.
    Ken


    Ver 1.182 on XL Pro plus Ver 1.164 and 1.175 on Windows 7 Ultimate
    It Never Fails * Till * You Say It Never Fails

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    222

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    Hi...as far as I know...(and I have been painting for over 25 years) there is no food safe stain...what I do is stain the piece and then seal it...on a piece that is to be used for food I use a varathane sealer...I have never had any problem at all with this..I use this method when I paint wooden bowls...etc...you might google it and see what comes up...maybe...they now have something out there on the market...

    Daphne
    Bob
    "I reject your reality and substitute my own!"
    aka-DrBob
    Laptop Running Version 1.131

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Northern Utah
    Posts
    507

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    I can't help you any on the stain but I use mineral oil on my cutting boards. It won't go rancid on you either.

  5. #5

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    Wouldn't a waterbased dye be food safe? I've used fabric dye, but food coloring would also stain wood. It wood take some experimentation to get the right mix.
    The 50-50-90 rule: Anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

    Do it on a Mac.
    Vietnam Vet '65-'66

  6. #6

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    Thank you all.
    HT

  7. Default


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    I actually saw the food safe stain and sealer at Lowes. I dont know if its unique to my location but i seen it in there before. Ive never tried it though..
    www.twinpeaksenterprisesllc.com


    "Premium, Kiln Dried, Dimensioned to your request, Black Cherry, Black Walnut, Poplar, woods limited quanities"

  8. Default


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    HT here are a few more food safe finishes

    Pure tung oil. Extracted from the nut of the china wood tree. Used as a base in many blended finishes. Available from catalogs and hardware stores. Difficult to apply, requires many coats, good water-resistance.

    Raw linseed oil. Pressed from flax seeds. Not to be confused with boiled linseed, which contains metallic driers. Listed as a food additive by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Very long curing time, good looks, low water-resistance, frequent reapplication.

    Mineral oil. Although derived from petroleum, it is colorless, odorless, tasteless and entirely inert. Sold as a laxative in drug stores and as a wood finish in hardware and kitchen-supply stores. Simple to apply, low waterresistance, frequent reapplication.

    Walnut oil. Pressed from the nuts of the walnut tree. Sold as a salad oil in health food stores and in large grocery stores. Walnut oil dries and won't go rancid. Easy to apply, frequent reapplication.

    Beeswax. The work of the honey bee. Can be mixed with an oil to create a better-smelling, slightly more waterrepellent finish. Sold in woodworking and turning catalogs.

    Carnauba wax. Derived from the Brazilian palm tree. Harder than beeswax and more water-resistant. Can be used straight on woodenware as a light protective coating or a topcoat polish. Sold in woodworking and turning catalogs.

    Shellac. A secretion from the lac bug. Harvested in India. Super blond shellac in flake form is the most waterresistant variety. A film-forming finish. Sold in woodworking catalogs and hardware and art supply stores.

    Nothing. Available everywhere. Makes a reasonable finish for woodenware. No application time. Free.

    A recipe for one sweet finish
    The food-safe finish that appeals most to me is one recommended by Jim and Jean Lakiotes, West Virginia makers of spoons and other kitchen items, as well as furniture. Their finish is a mixture of mineral oil and beeswax.

    To make it, warm the mineral oil in a saucepan over low heat, and melt a chunk of beeswax in it equal to about one-fifth or one-sixth the volume of the oil. (At high heat, there's a potential for fire. Be sure to keep the heat low, and consider using a double boiler.) As the wax begins to flake apart and dissolve, stir frequently. When the mixture is blended, pour it into a jar to cool and solidify.

    To apply, wipe on an excess of the soft paste, let it dry a bit, then wipe it off. If you want to apply it as a liquid, you can reheat it. Like any mineral oil or
    wax finish that will take a lot of abuse, this one will need to be reapplied often to afford decent moisture protection. But applying this fragrant finish is such a pleasure that you may find yourself looking forward to the task.

    Rav

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    East Liverpool, oh
    Posts
    322

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    Rav,

    Thats what i call doing your homework ! Notting like good oldfasion research.

    Thanks alot Michael

  10. #10

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    Thanks, I'll make a note of that.
    HT

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